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Signing up for ROTC?

LadyDianeskiLadyDianeski 9 replies1 discussions
So, DS says there's a two-credit ROTC class that he'd like to sign up for (for Fall 2013). Kind of an intro class for interested kids...something like that? Does this sound familiar? We can't seem to find any such course listing. Can anyone here give us guidance?

Thanks in advance!!
edited May 2013 in University of Alabama
9 replies
Post edited by LadyDianeski on
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Replies to: Signing up for ROTC?

  • SEA_tideSEA_tide 19 replies0 discussions
    I've known people who've considered taking the first couple courses in the Air Force Studies ROTC program (AFS in the course catalog). My understanding is that the courses are not overly difficult unless one makes them overly difficult and that there is no uniform requirement for those not in ROTC.
    edited May 2013
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  • KeithS4789KeithS4789 2 replies0 discussions Harvard Champion
    Do you know which program he's interested in (Air Force or Army)?

    If he's considering the two hour option for Air Force, he will need a uniform and will have to participate in at least two PT sessions a week. If he does the one hour class then PT is not required. In the course catalog it specifies that the courses are corequisites for AFROTC participation, but if he is just taking the classroom course then the corequisite requirement can be waived and he will be admitted as a "special student" instead of a cadet. If he does the two hour option, then he will need to dedicate around 4-5 hours a week to AFROTC.

    If it is ARMY ROTC he's interested in, I can provide some details but I'm not as familiar with their procedures and curriculum. I participated in AFROTC for about 5 semesters and can give more information if you have any specific questions.
    edited May 2013
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  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids 212 replies4 discussions
    Since your son has the NMF scholarship covering tuition and housing, does doing ROTC obligate him to anything even though he's not getting these expenses covered?
    edited May 2013
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  • LadyDianeskiLadyDianeski 9 replies1 discussions
    Thanks, y'all! Thanks you, Keith!

    I think he's interested in the Air Force thing. And no, I don't think he wants to become a cadet just yet -- this is more exploratory -- so I guess he would be doing the one-hour class.

    And Mom2CK, we wondered the exact same thing.

    I think he needs to look into it some more!
    edited May 2013
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  • gstudent99gstudent99 4 replies0 discussions College Search & Selection Champion
    Students can participate in ROTC without any obligation until they sign a contract with the military (Army, Navy, or AF depending on which program). For the most you can participate for 2 years without contracting. To participate in the advanced courses (essentially Junior and Senior year) you must move to contract status.

    If you receive a scholarship the rules of when you must contract to continue receiving benefits is outlined in the conditions of the scholarship, which can vary.

    You do not need to have a scholarship to participate or contract. You must get "accepted" by the ROTC staff (Professor of Military Science in the case of the Army) in order to contract. You will also have to go through a medical evaluation to ensure you are fit to serve to be eligible to contract.

    If you do sign a contract then you are under a legal contract to serve in the military. The consequenses of not serving (breaking your contract) vary. The military decides what those consequences are.
    edited May 2013
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  • LadyDianeskiLadyDianeski 9 replies1 discussions
    Thanks, gstudent!

    Keith, would AFS101 be the one-credit course you were referring to?

    Thanks!!
    edited May 2013
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  • KeithS4789KeithS4789 2 replies0 discussions Harvard Champion
    AFS 101 (Leadership Labratory) would be the course where he would need to participate in PT sessions and prepare for military training as a cadet.

    AFS 110 is the classroom course for the fall and AFS 120 is the classroom course for the spring. These courses are on Thursday afternoons before the Leadership Laboratory classes. All ROTC cadets participates in the 101/102 (fall/spring) class. The course number increases depending on the level of student e.g. 201 is for sophomores, 301 is for juniors, and 401 for seniors.

    If your son is not interested in wearing uniform on Thursdays and participating in PT he should not register for 101. He should register for 110.
    edited May 2013
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  • LadyDianeskiLadyDianeski 9 replies1 discussions
    Thanks so much, Keith!
    edited May 2013
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  • MontegutMontegut 19 replies2 discussions
    Just adding my two cents that you should be so proud of your son's desire to explore this. Young men such as your son, who are clearly bright and dedicated and already have their college expenses covered, could only be an asset to our nation.

    As to financial reward, I can tell you as a mom of an engineering student, and wife of a government contractor, military experience carries a lot of weight when applying for jobs at many companies, and whether the ROTC program covers his expenses or not, it will certainly be a plus on his resume and only help him in his future career.

    On an analagous situation, we have a good friend who is a student athlete but has the NMF. While most of his expenses are covered by his NMF scholarship, he does not have to pay for books, which, as an engineering major, is a pretty nice chunk of change.

    It is possible that as part of ROTC, your son may get some sort of stipend. I don't know if he has the engineering scholarship, which helps out with son's books/meal plan, but if he doesn't, your son may get an allowance akin to that.

    When I was in college, I had friends in both ROTC and band. Both programs gave them a monthly stipend, which was appropriate for the amount of time they had to commit to the programs.

    Again, good luck to your son and I wish him all the luck in the world with this!
    edited May 2013
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