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mathmom Junior Member

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mathmom
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  • Cghiru
    Hi Mathmom,
    I read a post from you saying that in your son's school, ap and honors classes are weighted the same. Im still in high school and am trying to change the way they rank one of the classes because it doesnt make sense, but it would help if i had another school as an example to show when im talk to my guidance consular. Basically, im just wondering what school your son went to. Thanks
    · Share
    October 2012
  • mathmom
    I don't really know anything about the AA especially today. From my experience, I'd say you should study architecture near where you hope to practice. Getting that first job isn't easy and it's a lot easier if your professors can help you make contacts. Plenty of good schools in NY and LA. I think US architectural training is not nearly as useful to the practicalities of what you'll actually be doing as an architect as it could or should be. Especially Columbia where I attended - and it's gotten even more theoretical. I thought the architectural training was much more practical in Germany from what I could tell.
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    April 2011
  • mom5kids
    Mathmom, Thanks for your dedication to CC, helping both students and parents. I wanted to contact you specifically due to your experience in Europe and profession. We live in a European capital city, the children born here, but consider ourselves bicultural. D debating between studying architecture in London, at the AA (Architectural Association School of Architecture), or somewhere in US. If in the US, can only see herself living/studying in NY, DC or LA. (Can't blame her really.) AA entry requirements so vastly different from US requirements. She wants to be able to work/practice anywhere, any country. Do you have any thoughts on the AA vs. US architectural training? Many thanks!
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    April 2011
  • mini
    So among the things he could do with limited time (which CRP really needs):
    - He can help set up for the English language socials, or men's domino nights! (a big deal)
    - He can help build shelves for the new kids' library
    - He can help with the kids' art or music classes
    - He can tutor a kid in English
    - He can help a women's self-help coop set up their displays at a local souk
    - He can help distribute materials to a family in need.

    Trust me - there is tons he can do, even with limited time.

    He can read my d.'s blog at meershanti.blogspot.com (the first part is about Jordan/the second about India. I can put him in touch with my d. as well.)
    · Share
    April 2011
  • mathmom
    The non stat part:
    He taught himself Scheme and Linux, worked on a mod for Civ 4 that won accolades in some gaming magazine, did some volunteer programming for a med school professor which got him thanked in the acknowledgments of a paper, and had two years of paid experience (full time in the summer off and on during the school year) at a computer firm that produces websites and background organization for the Oxford English Dictionary, the World Health Organization and Sky and Telescope. He had great supplementary recommendations from the computer firm and the professor.

    I think that his outside work in computer programming was probably very helpful given that the only thing he really had going for him was that he was a computer nerd, but I think he was able to sell himself as someone who had taught himself far beyond anything he learned at school.

    (He got into Harvard, waitlisted at Harvey Mudd, and deferred and ultimately rejected at MIT and Caltech.)
    · Share
    August 2010
  • mathmom
    Son's stats:
    97 UW GPA
    102 W GPA
    800CR/770M/690W SAT
    800/800/800 SAT2s (Math2, Phys, US Hist)
    APs (all 5s) CompSci AB (which he took as a freshman), Bio, Physics C, US History, Calc BC, Econ, Latin, Chem.

    ECs: Academic Team and Science Olympiad (he won medals at State level)
    · Share
    August 2010
  • mathmom
    4th floor, didn't see your message till today.

    My son asked profs at Harvard why he should choose them over CMU and really the only answer they could give him is "Because we are Harvard". Harvard has about 20 professors in comp sci and CMU has more like 200. Ultimately he wanted more choice, and a program that is generally agreed to be one of the top four in the country. SCS gave a terrific presentation at accepted students weekend. The fact that SCS is its own school within CMU allows it more autonomy and they aren't stuck with the Core requirements that Harvard imposes on all undergrads for example. Harvard is a great place for those who will appreciate the house system, who want a great education outside of computer science, and who want a chance of meeting the future leaders of their generation. My son was unlikely to appreciate any of that. There's no way of knowing how he'd be doing if he'd gone to Harvard, but he interned at Nvidia last summer and at Google this summer.
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    August 2010
  • mickjagger
    hi mathmom. i noticed that your son got into CMU SCS? i'm planning on applying there, to the SCS. could you please tell me your sons stats? i'd also appreciate any tips :).
    thank you :D
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    August 2010
  • 4thfloor
    Hi Mathmom,
    Could you tell me what your son didn't like about Harvard's CS department? Is it just because it is generally weaker than CMU's, or are there other specific reasons? I'd really appreciate knowing.
    Thanks.
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    May 2009