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Letter to my teacher

neuronerd36neuronerd36 Registered Users Posts: 3 Harvard Champion
edited May 2013 in Parents Forum
Title says it all. I am incredibly close to my chemistry teacher, who I work with in Science Research Club through being an officer. He has helped me with A LOT. I don't know if sending this letter will be a bad thing, or if it's cheesy or sappy, but I really wanted to express my thanks. Here is the letter (SORRY IT'S LONG, but I need thorough help):

I hope you are well. I just want to express my gratitude for your influence over the past two year.

You may remember my thoughts, which then evolved into a desire to explore my opportunities a bit more. The past few months were quite tough, in that I didn’t have a firm decision in what exactly I wanted to do with my passion for science. I remember feeling lost, confused, questionable, and even scared at times. While there were many outside factors, I have come to decide that I want to become a secondary science teacher.

You may ask: Which branch of science? I have still have yet to decide that. It’s quite funny, honestly, that what I really want out of my life is something that has been in front of me all this time, and I didn’t realize it till later. Yes, I did dream of being a doctor, then an engineer, and back and forth countless times. But as I head into those fields and learn more, I learn more about myself.

While desiring to be a doctor, I seemed to put tons of pressure on myself. I have to be perfect in this, I have to be perfect in that. The competition is cutthroat, and it’s not quite good for a budget. It would be such a risk to pay such an expensive tuition. I would've been in work and school for the rest of my life. Personally, as I learned more,, it seemed to me that I had other passions I wanted to continue in life, but then I wouldn’t really be able to keep up with them, since medicine would have become my life. I do at times feel regret in giving up a dream I had since I was a little child, but to have the weight lifted off of me gives me a huge confidence boost. It is so worth it. And I don't care anymore what my mother thinks.

As for engineering, it was such an interesting field to me. To have my eyes opened through my science fair project was a factor. But to put it more simply, it doesn’t really seem to fit me. I loved the science field. I did feel outside pressure since it was such a good option (me being female, family full of engineers, growing field), but it wasn’t what I really wanted.

Don't get me wrong, I still LOVE the two fields, but I can't really dedicate to a job that will not make me the happiest I can be.

What I really want to achieve in life is to apply my knowledge in the service to others. Science serves humankind. I wanted to help out a broad spectrum of people, and inspire them, just like you have for me. To see you so happy in your dedication in something you love is such an amazing thing. Every time the science research club meets, the look of excitement in my club mates' faces is just amazing. I love science, and I hope to inspire that in students.

I know some people may think I’m crazy for turning these two amazing options down, but I would be crazier to pursue something that I didn’t really feel passionate about.

I cannot thank you enough for all that you have done for me. What else can I say about these past two years?

I look forward to working with you in my senior year. And, please expect some silly questions here and there in trying to reach my goal. Thank you again.
Post edited by neuronerd36 on

Replies to: Letter to my teacher

  • Pennylane2011Pennylane2011 Registered Users Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    I sent you a PM with some comments on this letter.

    You don't have to definitely rule in or rule out any options at this point in time. You can explore teaching and also many other fields while majoring in a science in college. It's appropriate to note that this teacher has inspired you to consider being a teacher- but you don't have to dismiss any other fields at this time.
  • testobsessedtestobsessed Registered Users Posts: 8 College Search & Selection Champion
    edited May 2013
    What a wonderful, heartfelt letter. Congratulations on finding and following your passion, aspiring to enrich the lives of others, and remembering to thank someone who helped you along the way. You sound like a great kid to me, and I bet you will be a great teacher.
  • Pennylane2011Pennylane2011 Registered Users Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    Yes, I meant to say it is great to thank a teacher and there's always a need for great teachers. It's good that you have discovered an interest and to thank your role model.

    What I was speaking to is the personal stress of deciding, and your struggle with pressure to be a doctor or engineer. You don't have to be either of them if you don't want to be, and you don't need to decide one way or another now. I think it's great that you want to explore teaching, and you can do this without having to stress over a definite decision now because you don't have to have this kind of stress on you at this moment.

    To become an engineer- most students apply directly into an engineering program from high school. If you are certain this is not what you want, then don't apply. If you aren't certain, apply to a few of them. Then at the end of your senior year you will have had more time to consider this idea.

    To be a science teacher you can major in a science- then get a masters in teaching after an additional 5th year. This way you have a degree in science and can choose from there. If you are certain, you can also major in education. In many colleges you don't have to declare a major right away. Sometimes it is stressful to choose a major, but by college, some students have more information to help them decide. There are also career counseling centers on campus for information about future careers.

    Since you love science- go ahead and continue to explore it and enjoy it. You can also explore teaching by being a volunteer tutor, helping a teacher in the classroom and taking some education courses in college.
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