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Study says lower-achieving students often are taught by less-experienced teachers

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Replies to: Study says lower-achieving students often are taught by less-experienced teachers

  • barronsbarrons Registered Users Posts: 48
    edited May 2013
    Yes and at each one I received regular calls from headhunters looking to see if I would be open to a move to another firm.
    I have some pro experience in teaching too.
    The point remains, anyone that is good at their job does not have to accept conditions they do not like. Even good waiters get recruited by other restaurants with better tips/higher volume. Same for good exotic dancers. Your claim that the boss rules is false.
  • gouf78gouf78 Registered Users Posts: 54
    edited May 2013
    Glido (13) is right. Experienced parents and good students follow good teachers.
  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse Registered Users Posts: 252
    edited May 2013
    Xiggi, a lot of schools have teacher's unions and other things well in place that allow seniority to be rewarded in ways like choice. Trying to change any of things makes extracting teeth a breeze.

    When I lived in the midwest, when a new elementary school was built, there was a mass exodus from the other schools in the district by the most senior teachers as they wanted the newer facilities which also served a more well to do group. Not much anyone could do about it. Making changes in the way public schools are run is a terribly slow process.

    The fact of the matter is that MOST teachers want the higher achieving students. Given any choice, that is where they will go.
  • cobratcobrat Registered Users Posts: 85
    edited May 2013
    The fact of the matter is that MOST teachers want the higher achieving students. Given any choice, that is where they will go.

    This extends to the college level as illustrated when many topflight renowned Professors who taught at CCNY/CUNY when its admissions was highly competitive on the basis of academic merit jumped ship in the early-mid '70s when the system suddenly changed to open enrollment of anyone possessing a NYC high school diploma in 1969.

    The increasing flood of marginal and remedial students combined with a skyrocketing increase in crime from students* meant many such Profs and most of the remaining academically strong students thinking "This isn't what I signed up for" and leaving for other elite/respectable colleges.

    * Some of those Profs left after having valuables stolen outright during class and/or being physically threatened/assaulted.
  • HuntHunt Registered Users Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    My theory is that the teachers who are really bad end up teaching the weakest students, because their parents are less likely to complain about poor teaching. The better teachers and the parents of higher-ability kids want the same thing, and they usually get it. The parents of the weak students may defend their kids from disciplinary claims, but they're not going to complain about pedagogy.

    If you force the best teachers to teach the weakest students, and have weaker teachers teaching the best students, the good teachers and the good students will bail for private school.
  • gouf78gouf78 Registered Users Posts: 54
    edited May 2013
    A teacher wants to teach those who want to learn. It doesn't get more basic than that.
    I don't care what the initial level is--if somebody wants to learn there is somebody there who wants to teach them. It's a very sorry state that those who want to learn get lost in the shuffle.
  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse Registered Users Posts: 252
    edited May 2013
    In many major cities, the schools with the low achieving students also tend to have a danger element to them and are simply not desirable for that reason to a lot of the teachers. It's one thing to want to work with kids who are challenged academically, and need innovative teaching methods, and a whole other when there are environmental concerns over which you have no control or impact.
  • cobratcobrat Registered Users Posts: 85
    edited May 2013
    In many major cities, the schools with the low achieving students also tend to have a danger element to them and are simply not desirable for that reason to a lot of the teachers.

    This danger element is not limited to low achieving students in the major cities. The violent stalker harassing my client's granddaughter a few years back was doing so in one very well-off upper-middle class Midwest suburban town.
  • mathmommathmom Registered Users Posts: 70
    edited May 2013
    The phenomena of moving to the burbs is not all about the money. At least in the case I know most intimately, my friend got tired of teaching in a school with kids who needed to be in special ed or have more support, but instead were dumped in her classroom. Think 10 year old who can't read put in a 3rd grade classroom. Class sizes were large. Many children had unaddressed behavioral problems. She felt she was being set up to fail.

    BTW the most stressful thing in her opinion about teaching in the suburbs is the annoying parents. :)
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered Users Posts: 63
    edited May 2013
    If attracting & retaining good teachers in challenging communities is such a problem, then why not do what another public sector organization does? The U.S. State Dept offers its foreign officers incentive premiums for hardship locations. E.g., taking on a diplomatic posting in Cairo will pay better than taking on a diplomatic posting in Vienna. I have friends who voluntarily bid for postings in places like Eithiopia & Pakistan. They even take their school age kids with them. My friends who went to Pakistan got their car ambushed by gunfire, but then again that could happen in an U.S. inner city neighborhood, too...

    Foreign services officers are also unionized-- I'll bet most of you didn't know that....
  • janesmithjanesmith Registered Users Posts: 1 College Search & Selection Champion
    edited May 2013
    Pakistan is an unaccompanied post (like Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen). Yes you get danger pay but you have to be apart from your family.
  • minimini Registered Users Posts: 105
    edited May 2013
    I don't understand all the angst. More than 80% of folks report that they LIKE their local schools. Are they all lying?
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