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Unhappy freshman

24

Replies to: Unhappy freshman

  • tsdadtsdad Posts: 6
    edited May 2013
    What's wrong with going to USC?
  • MarsianMarsian Posts: 6
    edited May 2013
    It's unclear to me if D thinks that she is too smart to need a degree for a job, is too smart to need the HYP name for any boost in jobs, or wants to save money.
    [She] is missing the sun and the perceived free-living social life of college in SoCal. Is interested in applying for a transfer to USC for better social life, better greek system, better sports and school spirit and better sun.

    I think you've just answered your own question. She's tried HYP, given it a year, and still wants to go to USC or CC. It sounds like she's figured out that in her list of priorities an active social life and a familiar Southern California lifestyle are more important to her than prestige. I'd welcome her home, although as ucbalumnus suggested, I'd want her to withdraw in good standing just in case she changes her mind.
  • higgins2013higgins2013 Posts: 21
    edited May 2013
    Her interest in transfering seems like a good idea. For many prestigious local firms here, a HYP degree doesn't automatically trump a degree from flagship school's strong program. Many college counselors recommend "think locally" when chosing a college if your intent is to remain "local" after graduation. The local college/university's alumni network, internship opportunities, and regional reputation often can override the comparative "prestige" of a HYP degree. Here in our city, I've heard many ancedotal stories about firms' negative experiences with hiring "the Ivy grad"; there's somewhat of a negative "Ivy-type" stigma for certain firms in regards to their entry-level hiring practices.

    Given limited information OP's presented, transfer may be an excellent idea. Whether it's possible, and under what timeline, is another question altogether. Likely transfering from a HYP to a CC isn't the best plan. Perhaps she can transfer winter term? Time to investigate procedures?
  • KrliliesKrlilies Posts: 20
    edited May 2013
    If she is serious about film production, advertising and marketing, it's hard to imagine a better school than USC. I don't think the HYP name will give her a boost relative to USC in California.
    or
    have her take a leave of absence during which she can intern and figure out the best plan with a counselor.
    I agree with these too but no to the Arizona suggestion.
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn Moderator Posts: 118
    edited May 2013
    PLEASE take her to a counselor ASAP!! It's not a race to see how fast she can graduate from college. A counselor can help her figure out what she wants to do and evaluate whether she is depressed.

    From personal experience, I know how hard it is to let your child take a break, but it can mean the difference between long-term failure or success.
  • HuntHunt Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    I agree about the counseling. Something about the story just doesn't compute--somebody that active, in those particular ECs, would, I think, but a surprising example of somebody who was unhappy and wanted to transfer.

    But it is true that weather can be a huge issue for some people.
  • AgentninetynineAgentninetynine Posts: 2
    edited May 2013
    Not fitting in/enjoying one's choice of college does not equal depression. As a So. Cal transplant I completely understand your DD's p.o.v. As another poster mentioned upthread, east coast culture is different than the west. If after a year, she realizes she's happier at home, then what's wrong with USC?
    If she wants film she should also consider UCLA and Chapman.
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn Moderator Posts: 118
    edited May 2013
    It does not guarantee that she is depressed, but she COULD be! A layperson cannot tell.
  • minimini Posts: 105
    edited May 2013
    I'm betting that she's not depressed, just an hyp student with a 3.8 GPA and a good head on her shoulders who wants something else, and with reasonably good reasons.
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    I think talking about "depression" is premature. Maybe she knows exactly what she's doing, but asking to move from an HYP to a CC seems very unusual, no?

    With regard to counselor, therapist, etc, credential is not as important as experience and maybe word of mouth. But you want somebody who calls themselves a "therapist", not a counselor, since "counseling" credentials tend to be pretty narrowly focused. Lots of kids struggle in school, so there should be at least a few therapists who have good experience sorting this out.

    My D had an awful first year, although I didn't didn't realize how bad until she was heading back after winter break. She wanted to transfer, but by the summer, wanted to give it another go. She did therapy, and some things got better, or she adapted.

    If your daughter is willing to use therapy, I would jump on it.
  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys Posts: 57
    edited May 2013
    I think talking about depression is also premature. OMG I've agreed with mini more than 3x in the last two days. Good grief, the OP's D doesn't like her school and wants to transfer. If the OP had not uttered a word about HYP ask yourselves if your answer would be different.
  • HuntHunt Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    It's not that she was at HYP that makes me wonder if she's depressed, but the fact that she was in such high-energy activities, and is now comtemplating going to a CC.

    Of course, she may have been disappointed by cheerleading at those schools, and with sports and school spirit in general.
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    ^ The good news is, we don't have to try to evaluate her from here! (insert smiley face with a wink).
  • momofbostonmomofboston Posts: 1
    edited May 2013
    I think many kids and parents underestimate the power of "fit" into the college decision. I do think that almost all freshman have some adjustment issues into their new environment and it is only when they find their "people" that they tend to really start enjoying the experience. This could very well be just a poor fit socially for the OP's daughter. At the end of the day, IMO, the kid should be in an environment that satisfies them academically and socially...education is not all academic.
  • minimini Posts: 105
    edited May 2013
    "OMG I've agreed with mini more than 3x in the last two days."

    I must be slipping ;), or you've found religion. :)
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