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Salaries of public college chiefs rise, median tops $400,000

Dave_BerryDave_Berry CC Senior Advisor2 replies10 discussionsSuper Moderators
"Salaries of presidents of U.S. public universities rose almost 5 percent in the last fiscal year, even as tuition rose and student debt soared, with the median pay package topping $400,000, according to a report released on Sunday ... Penn State's Graham Spanier was the top earner last year at the time he was fired over the Jerry Sandusky scandal, according to the study by the Chronicle of Higher Education, though his compensation was inflated by $2.4 million in severance pay and deferred compensation." ...

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/05/12/us-usa-colleges-salaries-idUSBRE94B0EJ20130512?feedType=RSS&feedName=domesticNews&rpc=22
edited May 2013 in Parents Forum
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Replies to: Salaries of public college chiefs rise, median tops $400,000

  • kayfkayf 44 replies1 discussionsRegistered Users
    And most also get free housing, great benefits. No one is looking at this. Disgraceful
    edited May 2013
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  • BCEagle91BCEagle91 152 replies2 discussionsRegistered Users
    I think that the pay packages have some correlation to the amount of money presidents bring in. If a University President is making $380K and bringing in $50 million in donations and doing a good job running the university, is that a problem?
    edited May 2013
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  • tsdadtsdad 4 replies2 discussionsRegistered Users
    College presidents, as a group, earn every last dollar they get paid.
    edited May 2013
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  • momofzagmomofzag 6 replies0 discussionsRegistered Users College Search & Selection Champion
    I agree and what do you think are the media salary of the football coaches at public universities?

    I just saw a map of the U.S. that listed the state univ. football coach as the highest paid public employee in a huge majority of the states.....unfortunately, I can't get my hands on it know to link and/or cite the source.
    edited May 2013
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  • kayfkayf 44 replies1 discussionsRegistered Users
    Just because coaches are overpaid, doesn't mean university presidents should be. If university presidents were earning their money, maybe they would take control of sports. Maybe they would eliminate the over-proliferation of the number of deans and administration positions.
    edited May 2013
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  • greenbuttongreenbutton 21 replies0 discussionsRegistered Users
    Spanier's situation is a nauseating example of what's wrong with these packages. If I were fired, I would lose any right to severance or "deferred compensation" which is fancy language for a tax sheltered bonus upon leaving the U. He was FIRED. Terminated. Let go. Shown the door.....

    It's not really much different than corporate salaries being really high at the top. And that's okay and fine and not morally reprehensible. But getting to keep $2.4mill when you were fired? I want that job :/
    edited May 2013
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  • JonLawJonLaw 4 replies0 discussionsRegistered Users College Search & Selection Champion
    As a PSU student/alumni during the Spanier era, it is clear to me that President Spanier had two jobs.

    Obtaining donors (sales) and then engaging in massive expansion programs to get more donors (sales).

    Everything else was irrelevant to him.
    edited May 2013
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  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 60 replies3 discussionsRegistered Users
    Wow, the governor of Pennsylvania, Tom Corbett, is a bargain!!! His 2013 salary is only $187,256, and he is the HIGHEST paid governor. He overseas a state budget of $27 billion and a payroll of thousands of public employees. Corbett should try to move up the food chain and land Graham Spanier's Penn State job.
    edited May 2013
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  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 60 replies3 discussionsRegistered Users
    Here are other other examples of college bureaucracy bloat:
    Multiculti U. by Heather Mac Donald, City Journal Spring 2013
    In September 2012, for instance, as the university system faced the threat of another $250 million in state funding cuts on top of the $1 billion lost since 2007, UC San Diego hired its first vice chancellor for equity, diversity, and inclusion. This new diversocrat would pull in a starting salary of $250,000, plus a relocation allowance of $60,000, a temporary housing allowance of $13,500, and the reimbursement of all moving expenses. (A pricey but appropriately “diverse” female-owned executive search firm had found this latest diversity accretion.)

    In May 2011, UCLA named a professional bureaucrat with a master’s degree in student-affairs administration as its first assistant dean for “campus climate,” tasked with “maintaining the campus as a safe, welcoming, respectful place,” in the words of UCLA’s assistant vice chancellor and dean of students.

    In December 2010, UC San Francisco appointed its first vice chancellor of diversity and outreach—with a starting salary of $270,000—to create a “diverse and inclusive environment,” announced UC San Francisco chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann. Each of these new posts is wildly redundant with the armies of diversity functionaries already larding UC’s bloated bureaucracy.


    California's governor, Jerry Brown, is a bargain at only $173,000!!!
    edited May 2013
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  • BCEagle91BCEagle91 152 replies2 discussionsRegistered Users
    I think that you'll find NH legislators to be a big bargain too. They get paid $100/year and free trips through the toll booths. The latter perk may be worth a lot more than the $100/year for some legislators.
    edited May 2013
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  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 60 replies3 discussionsRegistered Users
    free trips through the toll booths

    I wanna be the guvna too!
    edited May 2013
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  • arco222arco222 10 replies2 discussionsRegistered Users Harvard Champion
    Many of them are making more than a million. But you know, college presidents need to eat too. And you got to admit, with rising tuition costs far outstripping inflation, they are collectively doing a pretty good job of running their businesses. And the best of them have people competing from birth to gain access to their product with the promise of prestige, riches and glory. Not a bad gig to be in.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/10/education/three-dozen-private-college-presidents-earned-over-1-million-in-2010.html?_r=1&
    edited May 2013
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  • mommusicmommusic 12 replies1 discussionsRegistered Users
    I don't mind a hefty salary for excellent performance, but the golden parachutes some of these guys get is unbelievable. They resign or are shown the door but their contract provides for generous compensation ($1.3 million over 2 years, in the case of UC's president who resigned last year.)

    You'd think somebody could make sure the contract was written more in the university's favor.
    edited May 2013
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  • PizzagirlPizzagirl 152 replies1 discussionsRegistered Users
    Are these college presidents also overseeing state flagship medical schools / centers and / or state flagship law schools? Because those are quite huge tasks and certainly pay well in the private sector.
    edited May 2013
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