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Sorry, College Grads, I Probably Won't Hire You (unless you can program)

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Replies to: Sorry, College Grads, I Probably Won't Hire You (unless you can program)

  • thumper1thumper1 Registered Users Posts: 125
    edited May 2013
    Well...here is the good news. According to the OP, his kids can learn this on their own...which means so can anyone else! Get out those self help books! Sky is the limit!
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered Users Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    It's ludicrous to suggest that a media planner at an agency needs to "know programming." Or even more ludicrous -- a strategic planner or an account executive or a creative. Honey, companies hire other companies to do all that dirty work. This is reminiscent of that terrible '80's advice -- "go into computers, you'll make a lot of money!" As far as I could tell, all those people who "went into computers" made a little bit more money out of the gate, and then stalled big time.
  • garlandgarland Registered Users Posts: 65
    edited May 2013
    My neice just graduated from a very good new media program with job offers. She's trained in journalism, promotion, marketing, etc. Don't believe "programming" was part of the program.
  • PolarBearVsSharkPolarBearVsShark Registered Users Posts: 20
    edited May 2013
    That article was really dumb.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered Users Posts: 296
    edited May 2013
    I don't doubt this but do you have a source? (For the productivity, not the pay)

    There is a Q&A and discussion about the topic, along with a list of (mostly print, not on-line) references if you want to look them up.

    Are there studies clearly illustrating the great discrepancies in programmer productivity? - Skeptics Stack Exchange
  • warbrainwarbrain Junior Member Registered Users Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    It's unfortunate that the author seems kind of smug, and it seems like he's turning a lot of people off to the idea of learning how to program. I think it would be great if everyone learned how to program, in the same way everyone learns physics, and poetry. Programming requires a sort of critical thinking that I think is hard to replicate in other subjects.
    Then I will happily find a job in a field where I don't need to learn how to program. Because not everyone is good at programming. Just like not everyone is good at writing.

    Are you saying that people shouldn't learn how to write?
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered Users Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    Oh god, no thanks. It's not as important as you think.
  • SansSerifSansSerif Registered Users Posts: 14
    edited May 2013
    I've been in advertising for 30 years. Lots of different companies, different industries. Never had to learn a bit of programming. Absolutely no reason to. I learned enough about each company and its industry to write about it. But I never had to know the technical details. I write marketing material, not tech manuals.
  • sosomenzasosomenza Registered Users Posts: 111
    edited May 2013
    Is it possible to short PubMatic? An understanding of the business is always necessary. Requiring all new hires in all departments to have programming skills is myopic lunacy.
  • Lemaitre1Lemaitre1 Registered Users Posts: 7
    edited May 2013
    While there may be only one graduate with a bachelors degree in Computer Science for every three jobs that require programming skills, there are going to be graduates in other majors that will fill many of these positions. For example, my younger son is a Physics major finishing his sophmore year. He has made it clear that he has no desire to go to graduate school after he gets his BS in Physics.

    I have told him that with only a BS in Physics, finding a job in that field will be very difficult and he might have to do something else like computer programming. He seems fine with that and has already completed three semesters of computer programming courses.

    I suspect that a fair number of Physics, Astronomy and Math majors who for one reason or another will not continue to graduate school and not really employable in the area that they majored in, but because of their quantitative skills, will find employment in computer programming.
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered Users Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    Well, I've got one econ major and one history / American studies major, and I certainly won't encourage them to take computer science programming if they aren't interested. I have the opposite reaction. I think it's very vocational in nature, and not part of a core liberal arts background.
  • warbrainwarbrain Junior Member Registered Users Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    Oh god, no thanks. It's not as important as you think.

    Umm, can you give any reason for this? Like I said, I don't see programming as any more important or useful than learning physics or poetry. Lots of people get by in life without using poetry, and programming is no different. I don't think that's a good reason for not teaching poetry, and the same is true for programming. And I think there is a lot of merit to learning how to program, even if you're never going to program again in your life.

    I personally don't really enjoy programming, and I don't enjoy analyzing poetry either. But I feel like I learned a lot from both activities. I don't see the need to look down on it.
  • warbrainwarbrain Junior Member Registered Users Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    I think it's very vocational in nature, and not part of a core liberal arts background.

    I think it's possible to teach programming in a way so that it's not as vocational, and fits into a traditional liberal arts curriculum. It's probably true that many schools don't teach programming this way.
  • turbo93turbo93 Registered Users Posts: 27
    edited May 2013
    Programming, in its finer form, is an art. In this form it really can't be taught. One has to have the innate skill to do it.

    My money would be that the businesses that require programming are doing so as a screening tool. Whoa, I need an admin assistant that knows Word, Excel, and Python and dare we ask, Lua?
  • maikaimaikai Registered Users Posts: 20 College Search & Selection Champion
    edited May 2013
    Programming is creeping into every profession. It just makes sense to have at least a little programming experience. Just look at how people use spreadsheets today. That's a very simple version of programming.

    Also, programming teaches logic, sequential thinking, priority setting. Learning the basics of programming can only help.
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