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Sorry, College Grads, I Probably Won't Hire You (unless you can program)

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Replies to: Sorry, College Grads, I Probably Won't Hire You (unless you can program)

  • LoremIpsumLoremIpsum Posts: 38
    edited May 2013
    There is a discussion about this article and its author on Slashdot, where the tech nerds hang out. Apparently this guy hires sales people in the US and sends the programming to India. So it's natural that he would expect his workers to be computer savvy enough to determine specs that cheap labor could sweat over. All in all, his "needs" seem to be at odds with the needs of most Americans -- i.e., keeping the better-paying jobs in our country.
    This guy is head of PubMatic, which is one of those companies on the fringes of on-line advertising…. The programming jobs are in Puma, India. The US jobs are for things like "Mobile Account Executive"… Requires "proven track record of meeting or exceeding sales targets."

    Ad Exec: Learn To Code Or You're Dead To Me - Slashdot
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    So it's natural that he would expect his workers to be computer savvy enough to determine specs that cheap labor could sweat over. All in all, his "needs" seem to be at odds with the needs of most Americans -- i.e., keeping the better-paying jobs in our country.

    Sure, it makes sense for them. It probably isn't necessary for his accountant, or his HR person, or his receptionist, or the workers in the lunchroom cafeteria. That's what started this whole brouhaha - the assertion that "everyone" needs to know programming, not just those whose direct day-to-day job calls for that knowledge.
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    I think I might be "programming" when I customize my electronic medical record. Most of it is "creating forms", but some of it feels like "programming".

    Here is an example of some instructions.

    "You can create your own user forms or screens, and incorporate them as part of your notes or treatment plans. Let's say that you need a section for your progress note to document Activities of Daily Living. You can create a form or screen with text fields, drop-down pick lists, date and numeric fields to capture the information for this section. To add a User Form requires the Administrative logon.

    Select User Forms from the Setup menu.

    1. Click New to create a new User Form.

    2. Enter the Name of the form or screen (e.g. Activities of Daily Living) in the Form Name field. When you tab to the next field, a table name is assigned based on the form name. The table name is used to create a database table to store information entered when using this form.

    3. Next, create fields for this section. You can create up to 50 fields per User Form.

    a) Click New to create a new field.

    b) Enter a field caption or label (e.g. Walking). When you tab from this field, a field name for the database table is assigned based on the caption you used.

    c) Select from one of the following field types:


    · Single line text - used for short text entries that do not wrap, optimally up to about 50 or so characters

    · Multi line text - used for longer text fields that wrap and can be unlimited

    · Drop-down combo (non-editable) - used for a drop-down combo list where you must select from the list

    · Drop-down combo (editable) - used for a drop-down combo list that you can pick from or type to enter an item not on the list

    · Date field

    · Time field

    · Numeric field - integer or whole number

    · Numeric field - real - used when you need to enter a number with decimal point

    · Numeric field - currency


    d) Enter a field size for text or drop-down fields. The size can either be from 1 to 255. For multi-line text fields where you need unlimited text capacity, enter a 0 (zero) for field size.

    Click the Suggest button to type an example of the text that is expected to be used in the field. QuicDoc will provide a running count and calculate the number of characters for you.

    e) If you used a numeric field, check "0 is Valid" if 0 is a valid value. For example, if used for age, 0 would not be a valid value; but if used for Co-pay amount it could be. The field size is not required.

    f) If you use a drop-down, you can create a pick-list by entering items and clicking Add. To Edit an item, double-click it from the list, modify it and click Edit. To Remove an item, select it and click Remove.

    After you have added the fields you need, click OK to save the form.

    Use the Up and Down buttons to reposition the order of the fields if necessary."

    I've created forms before, but I bet it helps to know what's going on behind the user interface.

    Note ; I did not read the article, and I have only read up to page 5 of the posts.
  • texaspgtexaspg Super Moderator Posts: 213
    edited May 2013
    ^ no, you are just a highly paid data entry operator. :p
  • cobratcobrat Posts: 85
    edited May 2013
    ^ no, you are just a highly paid data entry operator.

    A.K.A.: Software applications user. If programming was defined that broadly, every MSOffice user would be considered a bona-fide programmer. Somehow, I don't think computer programmers or techies like those on Slashdot would agree. :D
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    That doesn't seem like programming to me. You're just customizing a form to your own needs. The programming behind it is what tells the computer to actually create the box, or sum up these boxes, or whatever. To me, the analogy is choosing the font size and style I want on Powerpoint, or setting up my Excel spreadsheet so that Column A is formatted in green for any values greater than 100, or setting up my calendar so that my entries are in blue and my day runs from 8 to 5.
  • maikaimaikai Posts: 20 College Search & Selection Champion
    edited May 2013
    BCEagle91 wrote: "BTW, I am seldom accused of political correctness."

    Call me "Not surprised." ;-)
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    Yeah, but to use the application, you have to know what the "user forms", and "user fields" might mean. I didn't even realize I could modify the forms for the first several months. I think this is WAY harder than powerpoint or data entry, or picking colors on excel. Now complicated "if" "then" repeating formulas that depend on data in other "books" in excel? "yikes", I HATE that ish! Or as some of my kids would say; "that's MAD cray!".

    But I agree it is not programming. Maybe more like the stuff I might have tried before "GUI's", when we only had DOS? Who remembers that?
  • cobratcobrat Posts: 85
    edited May 2013
    when we only had DOS? Who remembers that?

    *Raises hand* Yo!

    Other than the Apple II I used in 5th grade, my first family computer* was a PC compatible 386sx/16 running Dos 4.01 and Windows 3.0. Upgraded the software to Dos 6.22 and Windows 3.1 a few months later.

    * Christmas gift from my late great-uncle when I was in HS.
  • LoremIpsumLoremIpsum Posts: 38
    edited May 2013
    No DOS for me! My first personal computer was a Mac in mid 1984. The 1984 Mac OS was later widely marketed by the name "Windows 95." ;)
  • ShrinkrapShrinkrap Posts: 11
    edited May 2013
    *Raises hand* Yo! "Other than the Apple II I used in 5th grade, my first family computer"...

    Nice!
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Posts: 153
    edited May 2013
    "First family computer" bought when my twins were 3 years old, and I probably have more computing power on my iPhone nowadays! Ah, the dinging of dial-up AOL ...
  • BeliavskyBeliavsky Posts: 14
    edited May 2013
    DOS lives on with the Windows command line cmd.exe (the command line is important to using Linux, and Mac owners should learn to use the terminal), and some facility with a command line, including the ability to move files, create directories, and compile and run programs, is part of my definition of advanced computer literacy. I will try to ensure that my children don't leave home without it.
  • BCEagle91BCEagle91 Posts: 154
    edited May 2013
    You guys didn't use PDP-9s, ELFs, KIMs and PDP-15s or IBM 360s?

    I have an HP-67 which still works too. I used to program games on it in high-school.
  • SansSerifSansSerif Posts: 14
    edited May 2013
    First computer: Apple IIc, with Pagemaker and Illustrator. I was in my 20s.

    Yes, I'm old. ;)
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