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Economics + Math Double Major. How hard?

millionthmillionth 4 replies3 discussions
I am interested in taking an Economics and Math double major but I'm not sure how hard this combination will be. Do Math classes at NYU have severe grade deflation? I need to keep my GPA up for job prospects and probably grad school, but I don't want to miss the opportunity to learn as much as I can during college.
edited May 2013 in New York University
11 replies
Post edited by millionth on
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Replies to: Economics + Math Double Major. How hard?

  • jackNYU2018jackNYU2018 12 replies0 discussions
    double major is always hard to do(especially if you need to do interns and jobs to pay the loan)...... you should know that for a fact.
    edited May 2013
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  • NYU2013NYU2013 42 replies0 discussions Junior Member
    ^^^^

    I completely disagree with the above; in fact I find it to be a common myth.

    A major at NYU is 8-10 classes, which translates to only 32 to 40 credits. A double major would translate into 64-80 credits (for math and economics, I think both majors are 40 credits). You have to take 128 credits to graduate - which means after you complete all the courses for a double major, you still have 48 credits that you have to take.

    But, you also have to complete the MAP.
    The MAP requirements consists of the following:
    1 'Writing the Essay' Course
    2 Sciences Course
    1 Math Course
    4 Foreign Language Courses
    4 Foundations of Contemporary Culture

    In total that's 12 courses - 48 credits.

    BUT You can test out of the math requirement; you can test out of the language requirement if you're fluent enough in a foreign language; your economics major will you exempt you from one of the Foundations of Contemporary Culture courses.

    That removes 6 courses from the MAP (2 if you're not fluent enough in a foreign language). That leaves you more than enough time to complete a double major - you just need to plan your schedule carefully and pay attention to all of the requirements you need to satisfy.

    Personally, I double majored in philosophy and politics and minored in psychology - if NYU allowed triple majors I would have graduated with a triple major. It's not difficult at all.
    edited May 2013
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  • millionthmillionth 4 replies3 discussions
    what about opinions specific to the combination I mentioned? ie Econs+Math
    is Math generally graded harshly at NYU?
    edited May 2013
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  • deathblade127deathblade127 7 replies1 discussions New Member
    @NYU2013, have you heard of the Math + Computer Science minor, is it basically a 50/50 split of CS and mathematics?
    edited May 2013
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  • NYU2013NYU2013 42 replies0 discussions Junior Member
    @millionth

    Math + Econ should each be 40 credits, but you check online - each department's website will list all of the requirements for each major.

    Because you'll be taking econ and math you'll be exempt from 2 of the general education requirements (quantitative and one of the social requirements).

    NYU has one of the best math departments in the US, but I have no idea how harshly they grade. The average GPA at NYU is quite high and is above the national average, so I don't think you would have to worry too much about grading.
    edited May 2013
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  • NYU2013NYU2013 42 replies0 discussions Junior Member
    @deathblade127

    Yes, I believe it's two CS courses and Calc I and II
    edited May 2013
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  • jackNYU2018jackNYU2018 12 replies0 discussions
    @NYU2013 I knew a few who took double major in U of T who can not find any time to do outside jobs, in fact they nearly studied to an insane level towards the end of first year. But they are not in NYU , I merely thought that difference should not be great between university.

    As for the op, clearly you should listen to him , as i am only relaying the information I got from some students that's not in NYU.
    edited May 2013
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  • NYU2013NYU2013 42 replies0 discussions Junior Member
    @jack

    That doesn't actually make any sense. Doing a double major does not add any additional work load to a student's schedule. Those individuals which you know were merely having issues handling the normal college workload - that difference is not attributable to differences between their university and NYU.

    Regardless of whether or not a student does a double major or not, they will be taking the EXACT SAME NUMBER of courses per semester. At NYU, this is 4 courses. At others it's 5 or 6. Regardless of whether or not you are taking a double major, you will be expected to take the same number of courses per semester.

    In order to graduate, students are required to complete a major and a required number of credits - this means that students have to take a minimum number of courses per semester (e.g. 4 at NYU). A student doing a double major will still be taking 4 courses per semester, because they still have to complete a certain number of credits to graduate. This means that you will be doing the EXACT SAME AMOUNT of work per semester if you're doing only one major or if you're doing a double major.
    edited May 2013
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  • jackNYU2018jackNYU2018 12 replies0 discussions
    @NYU2013, I believe he is doing Engineering , that's probably why. (Or does that not make any sense either?)

    I will confirm with him again, but i was told that its too much workload.
    edited May 2013
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  • NYU2013NYU2013 42 replies0 discussions Junior Member
    @jack

    Engineering requires a lot of time, but if he's doing engineering and another major then regardless of whether or not he was doing the other major he would still have the same workload. I.e. doing just engineering or doing engineering + another major requires taking the same number of classes per term. So let's say a regular engineering major takes 5 classes per term - 2 engineering courses and 3 assorted liberal arts courses. An engineering + math major, for example, might take 2 engineering courses, 2 math courses and 1 assorted liberal arts course.

    They're both taking the same number of courses, so their workload should be almost identical (although that will differ by individual class). The major difference between, say, math/physics/chemistry/engineering and non-STEM majors will be that one will spend most of their time solving problems while the other will spend most of their time reading.
    edited May 2013
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  • jackNYU2018jackNYU2018 12 replies0 discussions
    @NYU2013
    I see, thank you so much for clear that up.
    edited May 2013
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