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College Without Transcripts

HopeFailsHopeFails 1 replies2 discussions Forum Champion
I've been homeschooled my entire life. After finishing "high school", I didn't do anything with my life. So I've spent a year and a half at my parent's house doing not a whole lot of anything. Recently though, I've stopped being retarded and decided that I want to do something with my life, which includes going to college for me. The problem is my parents never planned for me to go to college, and in fact, they have absolutely no transcripts of my schooling for the past nineteen years of my life. I learned a lot, and I'm sure I'm just as smart as any public high-school graduate, but I have nothing to prove it with. In fact, I don't even have a high school diploma yet (even though I passed my parent's requirements). That's embarrassing.

So now I'm worried I won't be able to get anywhere. Do you need transcripts for all colleges?

It also doesn't help that my parents have not prepared me at all for college. They didn't think I wanted to go until a few months ago. So, my head's still spinning a bit trying to learn everything by myself.

What are my options? Can I look at the textbook shelf and write up a mostly-accurate transcript of what I've learned? I remember most of the materials I've been through, but I don't know if they allow for a sloppy job like that. Can I prove my knowledge by taking an SAT? ACT? ETC.?

Thank you for any help.
13 replies
Post edited by HopeFails on
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Replies to: College Without Transcripts

  • GeekMom63GeekMom63 11 replies0 discussions Junior Member
    Can I look at the textbook shelf and write up a mostly-accurate transcript of what I've learned?
    I assume most homeschoolers do this to some extent - I know we did. For most colleges, you will need supporting documentation, such as SAT Subject tests or CLEP tests or AP tests.

    You could likely go to your local community or junior college right away, after passing placement tests.

    Congratulations on having a goal, and good luck!
    edited May 2013
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  • WonderGirl2013WonderGirl2013 22 replies4 discussions
    I agree with Geekmom63. Definitely talk to your community college. You, like Geekmom63 said, will definitely need some type of documentation. I know it has been a couple years since you finished your homeschool studies, but did your parents keep ANY of your homeschool homework? It is helpful to have the textbooks, but it is extremely risky to write a transcript based on textbooks alone. Have you taken any standardized tests? Try to earn your GED. Talk to a college advisor. I am a homeschooler and had to document and update my transcript every semester for dual credit classes. I don't know what documentation they would want since you are no longer a high school student. If you earn your GED and take the Accuplacer test, you should be able to attend junior college, get your Associate's degree, and if you desire to, transfer to a university, providing you get proper guidance from your college advisors.
    edited May 2013
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  • mmmgirlmmmgirl 1 replies0 discussions New Member
    Sit down, open a Word document, and write yourself a transcript.

    From what I've seen, homeschoolers trend to be terrified at the idea of writing transcripts, but it's very simple. Just write down a list of courses you took. If you don't remember what courses you took, see if you can find your old textbooks and schoolwork to remind you. If you did really unstructured schoolwork, just try and come up with some reasonable titles that roughly match what you did. For example, if you read boss and wrote something more complex than a Facebook status, you can put English. If you studied math, each level - Algebra 1, Geometry, Trigonometry, etc - equals a course. And so on.

    For grades, unless your parents actually grade each assignment, you can say you got an A if you feel you mastered the subject. I don't consider this dishonest; most homeschoolers get a lot of A's. It's hard not to when your classes were custom designed for you.
    edited May 2013
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  • sosomenzasosomenza 109 replies1 discussions Junior Member
    I think there are rules for homeschooling including annual reporting to the state department of Ed. Anyway, if the reports were never filed then you're probably not considered a HS grad. It might be GED time.
    edited May 2013
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  • marblingmarbling 4 replies0 discussions
    >>>I think there are rules for homeschooling including annual reporting to the state department of Ed. Anyway, if the reports were never filed then you're probably not considered a HS grad. It might be GED time.

    No, this information is absolutely incorrect. While some states may have various rules, not following those rules does not negate your completion of high school and certainly does not require one to substitute and take a GED.

    With very (very, very) few exceptions, I would never suggest a homeschooler take a GED. That's just as ridiculous as suggesting that someone from public school take a GED.

    mmmgirl is right, sit down and write yourself a transcript. You can google "homescholar how to write a transcript." She has many terrific--and free--ideas on how to come up with courses if your schooling was less than traditional.

    You can order a diploma online. I've been looking at two specific websites recently.

    If you'd like more specific links, please PM me. Congratulations on being motivated! Your troubles with a transcript and diploma are very small things to take care of, so don't be intimidated by either!
    edited May 2013
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  • sosomenzasosomenza 109 replies1 discussions Junior Member
    Marbling: It always amazes me when I answer in a fairly open ended manner, yet the petulant can only see things one way. Re Annual reports: I know some states require an annual reporting showing evidence of progress. Without such reporting the home school will likely lose its credential to teach. Without credentials there is no home school.
    Do I need to go on? In the OP's case it seems fairly clear there are no records, transcripts or credentials. If you're saying one can call himself homeschooled without any proof of schooling then pass the word. A lot of drop outs will be interested.
    edited May 2013
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  • AlmawadxpAlmawadxp 3 replies1 discussions Forum Champion
    take SAT subjects I advice you to go to UB unevirsity there is system for homeschool that you take sat subjects without diploma
    edited May 2013
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  • AlmawadxpAlmawadxp 3 replies1 discussions Forum Champion
    here your order
    Admission by exception | UC Admissions

    and note evenMIT accept homeschool but you should ask admission
    most universities need this subject:

    a. History/social science 2 years
    b. English 4 years
    c. Mathematics 3 years
    d. Laboratory science 2 years
    e. Language other than English 2 years*
    f. Visual and performing arts 1 year
    g. College-preparatory elective

    try to take SAT subject and before that determine which university tyou are intersting

    good luck
    edited May 2013
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  • marblingmarbling 4 replies0 discussions
    >>>>Marbling: It always amazes me when I answer in a fairly open ended manner, yet the petulant can only see things one way.....

    What you stated in #5 is absolutely incorrect, and you state something entirely different in #7.

    State laws vary widely. Some require portfolios, some require annual testing, some require nothing at all--and many others fall somewhere in between all of this. For example, just in my state, certain homeschooled students may test annually OR be evaluated by a certified teacher. Others do not need to report at all. Being in violation of one's state homeschool law does not negate graduation.

    While you may mean well in your attempt to answer, you are passing on wrong information. In trying to defend yourself, you're calling me "petulant" (irony!) and trying to show your superiority ("Do I need to go on?"). Your entire second paragraph drips with sarcasm, which is unnecessary and rude.

    I'm not sure how I've offended you. I'm correcting misinformation that you've shared with the original poster. You are making blanket statements about what you "think" (#5) and "know" (#7), and your statements are inaccurate.
    edited May 2013
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  • HopeFailsHopeFails 1 replies2 discussions Forum Champion
    Thanks for the information, everyone.

    My state (WI) doesn't require annual reports, so I should be safe.

    I know what I've studied, so I've prepared a college transcript for myself (I'll finalize it later).

    To be completely honest, I really don't know what to do next. How do I decide which college to go to/which one will have me? If somebody could link me to a website explaining the basics of college admission, I'd be very grateful, because I have no knowledge of the subject.
    edited May 2013
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  • kypdurronkypdurron 25 replies1 discussions New Member
    This is a great source to use:
    https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/get-in
    edited May 2013
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  • sosomenzasosomenza 109 replies1 discussions Junior Member
    Marbling: Instead of attacking me. Why don't you just admit that many states have home schooling regulations-Oh wait a minute you just did-Thanks for agreeing. BTW starting with a blanket statement, and then on challenge, applying a specific example in support of blanket statement is logical and appropriate in ordinary discourse.
    edited May 2013
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  • sosomenzasosomenza 109 replies1 discussions Junior Member
    OP: reviewing home schooling requirements is a good start. My quick research shows that a form called PI-1206 needs to be filed every year. Here's my cite. Assuming all the paperwork is in order. I think the place to start is with community college. Take the math and English placement tests and they will recommend which classes are a good start. GL

    homeschooling-wpa.org/getting-started/
    edited May 2013
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