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Flexibility of classes + Joint concentration?

gallifreygallifrey Registered Users Posts: 1 Harvard Champion
edited May 2013 in Harvard University
I'm interested in applying to Harvard, but if I were to go, I would choose a rather unique joint concentration of East Asian Studies and Physics. In order to joint concentrate, I know you have to do the honors track of both programs, and the course requirements are about 13-15 half courses each. If my calculations are correct, that leaves a lot of space for other classes, which surprises me— I was wondering if anyone who has done a joint concentration or has planned it out before sees that my observation is accurate? That flexibility is really ideal but I want to make sure it exists before deciding on which schools I want to apply to.

I see myself as sufficiently qualified to get into Harvard and I think any comments claiming that this is irrelevant to think about now when I "probably won't get in anyway" are a waste of time. Thank you!
Post edited by gallifrey on

Replies to: Flexibility of classes + Joint concentration?

  • notjoenotjoe Registered Users Posts: 1 College Search & Selection Champion
    edited May 2013
    gallifrey,

    My son declared a joint concentration in physics and classics, so I assume East Asian Studies and physics can be done, too.

    Nailing down the details, however, and getting all parties to agree, is time-consuming and not guaranteed of success. He had to go ask, to persist, to persevere, to make appointments, to do the legwork, to repeatedly make phone calls, visits and e-mails. But my son found a lot of good will in both departments to help him navigate to his ultimate goal, even though he had to repeatedly ask for that assistance.

    As well, I don't know whether you're aware of it, but undergraduates at Harvard typically take four courses per semester, and thus graduate with 32 one-semester courses. There are also a set of required courses apart from those required for one's concentration. You can take a fifth course, if you can hack it, but many students find their load suffiicently-heavy with four courses. I don't know whether you've factored these things into your calculations.
  • gibbygibby Registered Users Posts: 27
    edited May 2013
    "If my calculations are correct, that leaves a lot of space for other classes, which surprises me."

    Harvard requires students to complete 8 general education requirements, in addition to taking expository writing, which leaves little room for electives for those opting for joint concentrations. See: Homepage § Program in General Education

    I'm assuming you've checked out:
    http://harvardealc.org/EAS%20Handbook.pdf
    http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic772486.files/Physics.pdf.

    "I see myself as sufficiently qualified to get into Harvard and I think any comments claiming that this is irrelevant to think about now when I "probably won't get in anyway" are a waste of time."

    You certainly have the ego for the place and would live up to that old adage: "You can always tell a Harvard man . . . but you can't tell him much."
  • DwightEisenhowerDwightEisenhower Registered Users Posts: 5
    edited May 2013
    I see myself as sufficiently qualified to get into Harvard

    Then you are certainly qualified to do your own Google searching.
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