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Payscale 2013 rankings

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Replies to: Payscale 2013 rankings

  • LakeCloudsLakeClouds Posts: 49
    edited May 2013
    ucb - great list. Has anyone analyzed the data from the schools you posted?

    Some of the schools that are good at selling logo sweatshirts may not be so great at getting graduates jobs which is what payscale points out.

    Here's a great link on an underemployed Harvard grad:

    http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/harvard-university/1410310-4-0-gpa-harvard-grad-working-retail-job.html
  • circuitridercircuitrider Posts: 14 College Search & Selection Champion
    edited May 2013
    ^^I read a good portion of that thread (and, btw, I do wish I could get some of that time back) and the example given doesn't stand for the case you wish to prove. Nevertheless, even if it did, I think if I had my choice between spending an hour in a cab driven by an under employed humanities major and an under employed accounting major - the humanities major would win. Overwhelmingly.
  • LakeCloudsLakeClouds Posts: 49
    edited May 2013
    The top schools in the nation don't need trade-related majors. A Harvard grad in English can just as likely land a plum WS job just as well as a grad from Wharton because of the name of the U.

    So a WJ job is somehow not "trade-related"? If that's the case, we need a whole lot more "tradesman" and a lot fewer blood sucking I-bankers, Vulture capitalist and Private Equity Churn and Burners.
  • drax12drax12 Posts: 18
    edited May 2013

    Re: biology majors' intentional underemployment

    Seems unlikely, since someone trying to improve his/her qualifications for medical school would likely want to take some sort of biology job over an unrelated job.

    Or to bide time in a grad bio program. But, a lot of people probably wouldn't think that way, and would rather want to be ungainfully employed because it would be an underchallenging position to allow more test prep.
    But then biology jobs do not appear to be very well paid. And it is not like every biology major would be in line for a high paying VC job if s/he wanted one.

    If the VC firm/company were to need someone who would be able to be trained to be expert in the biotech field, why not? Also, someone who's been trained in the life sciences would seem to be a good candidate for an analyst type position that could crunch nos, and do all the things VC-ists need to do to find good investments. I think we tend to put especially bus-related positions in a box -- person has to be bus or econ majors, etc. Engineers, generally, science majors, are be good candidates also. I've heard of those who washed out of med school (either didn't get accepted or too much time elapsed in trying to get accepted) turn to bus-related careers and later attended excellent b-schools. Obviously those who've gone this route to their eventual careers undoubtedly struggled initially in gaining their eventual foothold.
    The top schools in the nation don't need trade-related majors. A Harvard grad in English can just as likely land a plum WS job just as well as a grad from Wharton because of the name of the U.
    So a WJ job is somehow not "trade-related"? If that's the case, we need a whole lot more "tradesman" and a lot fewer blood sucking I-bankers, Vulture capitalist and Private Equity Churn and Burners.

    My example was of a Harvard grad who majored in English, a non-trade-very-academically-oriented major, ending up in the ultimate in trade-related jobs. But a good sense of humor nonetheless.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Posts: 296
    edited May 2013
    drax12 wrote:
    If the VC firm/company were to need someone who would be able to be trained to be expert in the biotech field, why not? Also, someone who's been trained in the life sciences would seem to be a good candidate for an analyst type position that could crunch nos, and do all the things VC-ists need to do to find good investments.

    But how many VC jobs are there of this type, compared to the number of biology majors there are?

    Re: "The top schools in the nation don't need trade-related majors."

    On the other hand, many of the popular liberal arts majors are chosen for pre-professional reasons:

    economics -> business or finance
    math, statistics -> finance
    biology -> convenient for pre-med due to overlap with pre-med courses
    political science, English -> seem to be popular pre-law majors for some reason
  • drax12drax12 Posts: 18
    edited May 2013
    LakeClouds:

    I didn't get very far in your link of the Harvard grad with a 4.0 working retail, but I did read the first couple of posts. This is a good example of a Harvard grad not needing to major in a trade from the second post:
    Among my kids' cohort, I know one Harvard history major (with a secondary concentration in painting) who is working for one of the big consulting firms at an outrageous salary...,

    And here's a good example from the same post of Harvard grad working a menial job probably prepping for a GRE along with paperwork for grad application:
    ... and another who is living with his Mom and working part-time as a janitor while he puts his PhD program applications together.
  • drax12drax12 Posts: 18
    edited May 2013
    ucb:

    I'm just speaking of someone whose dream career of being an MD has ended. Just because this person didn't attain his/her dream doesn't mean he/she can't have a successful career after retooling.
  • drax12drax12 Posts: 18
    edited May 2013
    Also, UCB, did you happen to notice how many and which u's gave specific law-school and med-school application outcomes of portions of their recent grads? I'd probably like to do an analysis of these u's, as compared especially to UCLA and Cal, particularly to med school. We know that most private u's tend to pump up their percentages by lowering the denominator figure, while UCLA and Cal don't, and I'd like to estimate what real percentages are of m-school acceptances by specific u.
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