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  • SwimkidsdadSwimkidsdad 11 replies0 discussionsRegistered User
    Swim18

    The times that Riverrunner suggest for Ivy League recruitment are somewhat fast. According to collegeswimming.com only 2 ivy recruits are listed in the top 50 recruits for women for 2013. The recruitment times listed on Cornell swimming website are about the minimums for Ivy League recruitment.

    I would continue to fill out recruitment forms for schools you are interested in. It's not unusual to complete 30 of these. Talk with your club coach about colleges also. I would go to college swimming.com and complete a profile. You can compare your national ranking to the 2013 recruits national rankings to find which schools you are competitive with. As soon as your grades for this year are final I would email a quick note to the coaches. Their response will give you some idea about their level of interest.

    Be available by phone July 1st. Hopefully Penn will not be the only one to call. Other schools may call later in the week. I would also train hard this spring and summer. Long course times can impact your recruitment. If you think you can improve your ACT/SAT scores I would retake these. Email or phone coaches that have shown interest in you at least once every 3 weeks.

    Good Luck!
    edited May 2013
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  • riverrunnerriverrunner 2 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Junior Member
    swimkidsdad, thanks for clarifying the quality of swimmers who end up at Ivies. I wandered over from the world of track and was extrapolating. I'm going to guess that, like runners, swimmers are often very smart kids, so I assumed more fast swimmers might be qualified for Ivies and be interested in attending. This swimmer could do more research, as you have, into how far down the performance list the Ivies have to go fill their rosters. This would be hugely informative for the swimmer heading into recruiting.
    edited May 2013
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  • fenwaysouthfenwaysouth 5 replies0 discussionsRegistered User New Member
    classicalmama posted.....I've been getting hung up on that because it has seemed to me there is a point where an academically well qualified kid (in the 75-100% range for a given school) with strong athletics--based on his school's scattergrams or other data--is likely to get into a school without the athletic recruit label; in those cases, the effort required to reach out to another pile of coaches has seemed to me to be an unnecessary stressor at this point in time for an already incredibly busy kid. (I just can't align myself with the belief that kids should endure great suffering in high school so as to receive their reward in college.). But I think what you're saying is that within that band of "reach" schools for the athlete (reach could be athletic or academic), the athlete should actively pursue as many relationships with coaches as possible. That's a fairly narrow band for my kid, but is probably much wider for others.

    It is a philosophical difference. I'd rather play offense than defense. Or stated another way, I'd like to choose among many different schools/athletic programs that want me rather than wait for someone to choose me. IMHO if your kid is in a "narrow band" (as you described) then his potential target schools are smaller, and potential choices even less (on the surface). I think that is a situation that absolutely requires you to play "offense" and consider any and all options to make sure you are selecting the right one. Trust me, my kid was in about as narrow a band as can be with D1 baseball and engineering. We were constantly looking at various options and reaching out to look at many different situations. As you can tell, my philosophy is to play offense.
    edited May 2013
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  • reach2playreach2play 5 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Forum Champion
    I have seen so many gifted athletes with outstanding grades sit back and wait for schools to come to them and end up with almost no options. You have to market yourself and be aggressive. Build a solid target list, and take the initiative. It pays off.
    edited May 2013
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  • classicalmamaclassicalmama 17 replies0 discussionsRegistered User Junior Member
    I think we're actually very close philosophically, and I agree with your offense/defense metaphor. What you've done is to closely consider your kid's interests--both academic and athletic--and made as careful and thorough a search as you could with those criteria in mind. I agree that the size of that list should be as wide as possible--within the parameters set by (realistic) academic and athletic goals. Absolutely, it's hard to determine that without taking a long careful look around. Ultimately, though, for some kids that may mean talking to 30 coaches and for other kids 6 or 7. So much depends on the high school, the student, the sport...

    I'm reacting here to the more general (and well-founded) hysteria I think many of us feel right now about the current state of college admissions. Faced with incredibly steep odds, on the most extreme end, we can push our kids relentlessly to top the next kid with endless e.c.'s, extra sport stuff, AP's, SAT retries, so that he/she will win the race, and aggressively push them to contact coaches just to be safe, even if those schools may not be good places for kids to be. I'm NOT saying that anyone here is doing that, but I cannot explain the current insanity in application numbers as anything but parents and kids are so worried about getting in to certain schools that they cannot take a step back and make more thoughtful, measured choices.
    edited May 2013
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